College of Agriculture, Food and Environment Teaching Resources

Respondus Lockdown Browser Information

Looking for assistance in creating quizzes or exams? Want to know more about UK’s online proctoring service Respondus? Check out this resource. Additional information is available in the CAFE Teaching Resources Canvas Shell. Please contact Deloris Foxworth for one-on-one consultation.


UK CAFE Remote Instruction and Work Support Room - Office Hours and Open Questions


One on One Virtual Consultations

CAFE has created a Zoom room, https://uky.zoom.us/j/615534296, to support faculty and staff who have questions on using Zoom, Canvas, and Google's Suite of Products or would like to test/practice their skills as we make the transition to online learning, and potentially remote work. Please schedule a one-on-one appointment or email your question(s). 

UK Teach Anywhere
UK just launched a website for teaching resources (https://teachanywhere.uky.edu/), and Dr. Agouridis is continuing to provide links to general and CAFE specific items in the CAFE Teaching Resources Canvas Shell


Textbooks and Open Educational Resources

UK Libraries can help identify open educational resources such as alternative textbooks. If you are already using a textbook, see if the publisher is offering students free access to e-textbooks the rest of the semester.



Advice for Instructors

The simplest and most effective technique will be to have a helper (standing nearby, not at the back of the room) film the faculty member conducting the lab using a mobile device. That way they can use both hands and talk to the camera. Present in one take and no editing is needed - upload from a mobile device directly into Canvas. I suggest everyone to consider this option first.

Brian Volland, Visualization Media Specialist with Agricultural Communication Services, shares best-practice ideas.

https://web.microsoftstream.com/video/b293d35a-1d9a-436d-8968-c83bf135d8ed

Tips for Instructors

Be mindful of what screens you have open. To avoid sharing sensitive materials, shut down your email and all other documents/programs except those needed for the meeting. If you need to access sensitive materials while in the meeting, first pause sharing. You can resume sharing when you are ready.

Communicate regularly with your students. Consider using features in Canvas such as Announcements and Inbox. Announcements is a great way to send Zoom meeting invitations.

Discuss your expectations for online behavior and etiquette. For some students, this will be their first time participating in an online classroom.

Give yourself a break and don’t let perfection become the enemy of good. In-class lectures and labs are not perfect, so don’t expect perfection in online content, particularly with this rapid transition.

This point cannot be stressed enough. Schedule practice meetings with your colleagues and friends and try out all the features you plan to use in class.

Remind your students to download the Zoom app if they are using a mobile device. Click here to access the Download Center. If they are using a web browser, Zoom will download automatically when they first join a meeting.

Consider scheduling a separate introductory class meeting in Zoom to take students on a tour of Zoom’s features.

When scheduling your Zoom meeting, considering muting participants upon entry.

To improve meeting quality, especially for classes of ten or more students, turn off participants videos. Participants can still see what you share on your screen. 

Even if you are practicing synchronous delivery, consider recording and posting videos. Some students may have limited access to the technology needed to participate in live lectures.

Several options are available for sharing videos. The CAFE recommend you upload videos to Microsoft Stream or OneDrive and post video links in Canvas.

If you are recording your lectures for asynchronous delivery instead of live delivery, make several shorter (e.g., 5 min) videos instead of one long one. Students are better able to process information in shorter segments.

Whether your teaching synchronously or asynchronously, think about ways to keep students engaged. If your lecture is live, ask questions of the students, request feedback verbally or via chat, or consider using breakout rooms. If you are presenting material asynchronously, keep videos short to allow students to process information in smaller blocks. Short assignments in between videos will help keep students engaged.

Breakout rooms are a great way to allow students to work in small groups within the larger Zoom meeting.

If you are holding virtual office hours or advising, waiting rooms will allow you to control when participants join and leave a meeting.

Carmen Agouridis – carmen.agouridis@uky.edu
Brian Lee – blee@uky.edu
Chris Canjar – cm.canjar@uky.edu
Chad Jennings – chad.jennings@uky.edu
D
eloris Foxworth - deloris.foxworth@uky.edu


UK Teaching website

Take a tour of UK’s Teach Anywhere website. Be on the look-out for additional workshops, trainings, and other helpful resources.